Saltwater Fly Rod & Reel Rigging Information Inshore & Offshore Big Game Including Sailfish, Marlin, Tuna, Snapper, Roosterfish

Rigging & Product Information for Big Game Saltwater Fly Fishing - Sailfish, Marlin, Yellowfin Tuna & Inshore Species Roosterfiish, Cubera Snapper & Jacks

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Billfish Rig

Rod: Scott  15 wt. (BW8415)

Reel: Ross Momentum LT #8

Backing:  Cortland Micron Fly Line Backing 30 lb

Running Line:  Cortland Briaded Mono Running Line 30 lb

Fly Line: Cortland LC-13 Lead Core

Class Tippet: Eagle Claw Lazer Line 20 lb

Shock Tippet: Jinkia 100lb, 0.74-1.00 mm

Crimps: Jinkia Size J

Hooks: Eagle Claw Big Game P195 Lazer Sharp 7/0 - Eagel Claw L097RG Lazer Sharp Wide Gap 6/0 - Eagle Claw L226BLK Lazer Sharp Octopus 5/0 & 7/0

This set up is a combo sailfish marlin rig.  For marlin only I would make a couple adjustments you can read in steps 2 & 3.  The most important concept when rigging for billfish, especially for marlin is to reduce line drag in the water.   The majority of marlin bites are lost in the initial run because the line drag will break the tippet.   By using micronite backing, eliminating a butt section and use of a shooting head instead of a fly line you will increase your odds greatly.   This set up will also provide you with many more yards of backing which will be needed when hooking up marlin.   The space on the spool taken up by a long billfish line is much better served with extra yards of backing.   Billfish fly lines are also expensive and they do get lost so you can save yourself some good money with this rig.   Remember a billfish cast is short so you just need a good enough head to get your fly out there.

1. Start by loading your micronite backing on the spool, Arbor Knot is fine.   Lay it on tight and even as possible in a left to right pattern and not to stack the line stright on top of itself.  You want to come off smooth and even side to side and not bunch up and get a back lash.  I try and get as much backing as I can on the spool.

2. Next attach your running line.   I prefer a Nail Knot but an Albright is usable.   The running line should be about 30 yards max and the more experience you have the shorter it can be.  When comfortable switch to the Cortland Cobra Plus Mono.  The reason for the running line is to give the angler something to tug in order to set the hooks.   The micronite backing will slice you fingers if you let the fish take that much line before the hook set.   This section of running line is also a good indicator that the fish is nearing the boat. (For marlin only elimiate the running line too).

3.  Attach you running line to a 10' - 15' length of Cortland LC-14 lead core to creat your shooting head with an Nail Knot.   Shorter is better because this lead core does have a tendacy to kink so be aware of that.   Again your not making a long cast normally for billfish your just zipping a weighty fly out there.   At times you may be called on to get a cast out as far as you can so give yorself that chance.  Create a loop in the end of the line using a crimp in order to attach your fly.  That crimp creates a more hydro-dynamic connection than a double overhand, etc.  (For marlin only you will fix your fly to the head with a Nail Knot)

4. Using Eagle Claw Lazer Line create your class tippet by tying a double bimini twist.   Do not use pre fabricated tippet and do not use any other knot system.  If you need tippets mailed to you contact me.   Attach your fly to your shooting head using a loop to loop system. (For marlin only you will fix your fly to the head with a Nail Knot)

A class tippet must be made of nonmetallic material and either attached directly to the fly or to the shock tippet if one is used. The class tippet must be at least 15 inches (38.10 cm) long (measured inside connecting knots). There is no maximum length limitation.

5.  Attach your shock tippet to the class tippet using and Albright Knot

A shock tippet, not to exceed 12 inches (30.48 cm) in length, may be added to the class tippet and tied to the lure. It can be made of any type of material, and there is no limit on its breaking strength. The shock tippet is measured from the eye of the hook to the single strand of class tippet and includes any knots used to connect the shock tippet to the class tippet. In the case of a tandem hook fly, the shock tippet shall be measured from the eye of the leading hook.

Tuna Rig

Rod: Scott  12 wt. (S4s9012) or 10 wt (X2S9010)

Reel: Ross Momentum LT #8

Backing:  Cortland Micron Fly Line Backing 50 lb

Fly Line: Cortland Precision Quick Descent - 15' - 30' Sinking Tip

Butt Section: Ande IGFA Fluorocarbon 80 lb, 8' piece (crimp size 1.00 mm/Jinkia Size J)

Class Tippet: Ande IGFA Fluorocarbon 20 lb

Shock Tippet: Jinkia 100lb, 0.74-1.00 mm

Crimps: Jinkia Size J

Hooks: Eagle Claw, style depending on the fly used

When I fish for tuna my strategy is to get the fly as deep into the water column as possible.   For that purpose I like to use a fast sink fly line.   Usually these schools of tuna are fast moving so we try and get out in front them and cast than strip line out.   As the school passes under and around the boat the angler will retrieve.    In this rig I add the use of a butt section.  Tuna are so finicky that I like to use the fluorocarbon between the fly line and to give some extra space.

1. Start by loading your micronite backing on the spool, Arbor Knot is fine.   Lay it on tight and even as possible in a left to right pattern and not to stack the line stright on top of itself.  You want to come off smooth and even side to side and not bunch up and get a back lash.  I try and get as much backing as I can on the spool.

2. Attach the fly line to the micronite backing using a Nail Knot

3. Attach an 8' butt section to the fly using a Nail Knot and put a loop in the end of the line using a crimp

4. Using Ande Fluorocarbon create your class tippet by tying a double bimini twist.   Do not use pre fabricated tippet and do not use any other knot system.  If you need tippets mailed to you contact me.   Attach your fly to your shooting head using a loop to loop system. (For marlin only you will fix your fly to the head with a Nail Knot)

A class tippet must be made of nonmetallic material and either attached directly to the fly or to the shock tippet if one is used. The class tippet must be at least 15 inches (38.10 cm) long (measured inside connecting knots). There is no maximum length limitation.

5.  Attach your shock tippet to the class tippet using and Albright Knot

A shock tippet, not to exceed 12 inches (30.48 cm) in length, may be added to the class tippet and tied to the lure. It can be made of any type of material, and there is no limit on its breaking strength. The shock tippet is measured from the eye of the hook to the single strand of class tippet and includes any knots used to connect the shock tippet to the hook.


 

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